Discussion:
Récoltes record grâce au dioxyde de carbone et au réchauffement climatique
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Cardinal de Hère
2018-01-30 17:17:22 UTC
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La planète reverdit, les rendements agricoles augmentent grâce à
l'élévation du taux de dioxyde de carbone atmosphérique.

http://www.drroyspencer.com

Global warming be damned — full speed ahead on the Maize Train.

Kentucky Corn Growers Association

The numbers are in from USDA, and 2017 saw a new record in average corn
yield, with 176.6 bushels per acre.

In fact, the last four growing seasons (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017) had
higher yields than any previous years. The last time that happened was
in 1964.

And compared to 1964, the U.S. is producing nearly three times as much
corn per acre as we did back then.

There is no indication of a slowdown in the long-term upward trends in
corn yields. While the 176.6 bpa U.S. average for 2017 is a huge
increase compared to just 50 years ago, the latest winner for the
highest yield produced by a single farmer has risen again to over 542
bpa, which is fully three times the U.S. average yield.

While the global warmmongers continue to wring their hands over rising
temperatures hurting yields (the Corn Belt growing season has indeed
warmed slightly since 1960), improved varieties and the “global
greening” benefits of more atmospheric CO2 have more than offset any
negative weather effects — if those even exist.

Globally, upward trends in all grain yields have been experienced in
recent decades. Of course, droughts and floods cause regional crop
failures almost every year. That is normal and expected. But there has
been no global average increase in these events over the last century.

In his latest movie, Al Gore claimed just the opposite for wheat yields
in China. While I hesitate to call him a liar, since I don’t know where
he got his information — Gore was just plain wrong.

The sky is not falling. Life on Earth depends upon CO2, even though
there is so little of it — now 4 parts per 10,000 of the atmosphere,
compared to 3 parts a century ago. No matter how much we emit, nature
gobbles up 50% of it.

Most of the evidence suggests that life is now breathing more freely
than any time in human history, thanks to our CO2 emissions.
Féfé (avec 2 f gomme vourchette)
2018-01-31 00:29:52 UTC
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La planète reverdit, les rendements agricoles augmentent grâce à l'élévation
du taux de dioxyde de carbone atmosphérique.
http://www.drroyspencer.com
Global warming be damned — full speed ahead on the Maize Train.
Kentucky Corn Growers Association
The numbers are in from USDA, and 2017 saw a new record in average corn
yield, with 176.6 bushels per acre.
In fact, the last four growing seasons (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017) had higher
yields than any previous years. The last time that happened was in 1964.
And compared to 1964, the U.S. is producing nearly three times as much corn
per acre as we did back then.
There is no indication of a slowdown in the long-term upward trends in corn
yields. While the 176.6 bpa U.S. average for 2017 is a huge increase compared
to just 50 years ago, the latest winner for the highest yield produced by a
single farmer has risen again to over 542 bpa, which is fully three times the
U.S. average yield.
While the global warmmongers continue to wring their hands over rising
temperatures hurting yields (the Corn Belt growing season has indeed warmed
slightly since 1960), improved varieties and the “global greening” benefits
of more atmospheric CO2 have more than offset any negative weather effects —
if those even exist.
Globally, upward trends in all grain yields have been experienced in recent
decades. Of course, droughts and floods cause regional crop failures almost
every year. That is normal and expected. But there has been no global average
increase in these events over the last century.
In his latest movie, Al Gore claimed just the opposite for wheat yields in
China. While I hesitate to call him a liar, since I don’t know where he got
his information — Gore was just plain wrong.
The sky is not falling. Life on Earth depends upon CO2, even though there is
so little of it — now 4 parts per 10,000 of the atmosphere, compared to 3
parts a century ago. No matter how much we emit, nature gobbles up 50% of it.
Most of the evidence suggests that life is now breathing more freely than any
time in human history, thanks to our CO2 emissions.
L'humain ferait-il partie d'un "plan" de l'univers'
l***@wanadoo.fr
2018-01-31 07:21:07 UTC
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Post by Cardinal de Hère
La planète reverdit, les rendements agricoles augmentent grâce à
l'élévation du taux de dioxyde de carbone atmosphérique.
http://www.drroyspencer.com
Global warming be damned — full speed ahead on the Maize Train.
Kentucky Corn Growers Association
The numbers are in from USDA, and 2017 saw a new record in average corn
yield, with 176.6 bushels per acre.
In fact, the last four growing seasons (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017) had
higher yields than any previous years. The last time that happened was
in 1964.
And compared to 1964, the U.S. is producing nearly three times as much
corn per acre as we did back then.
There is no indication of a slowdown in the long-term upward trends in
corn yields. While the 176.6 bpa U.S. average for 2017 is a huge
increase compared to just 50 years ago, the latest winner for the
highest yield produced by a single farmer has risen again to over 542
bpa, which is fully three times the U.S. average yield.
While the global warmmongers continue to wring their hands over rising
temperatures hurting yields (the Corn Belt growing season has indeed
warmed slightly since 1960), improved varieties and the “global
greening” benefits of more atmospheric CO2 have more than offset any
negative weather effects — if those even exist.
Globally, upward trends in all grain yields have been experienced in
recent decades. Of course, droughts and floods cause regional crop
failures almost every year. That is normal and expected. But there has
been no global average increase in these events over the last century.
In his latest movie, Al Gore claimed just the opposite for wheat yields
in China. While I hesitate to call him a liar, since I don’t know where
he got his information — Gore was just plain wrong.
The sky is not falling. Life on Earth depends upon CO2, even though
there is so little of it — now 4 parts per 10,000 of the atmosphere,
compared to 3 parts a century ago. No matter how much we emit, nature
gobbles up 50% of it.
Most of the evidence suggests that life is now breathing more freely
than any time in human history, thanks to our CO2 emissions.
Voudrais-tu faire croire que les récoltes exceptionnelles sont dus à l'action du RCA (Rassemblement des Cons Antinucléaires) ?
--
L.C.

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